Woman holding a sign, listing black people killed by police, and after each name, "no conviction" for all but the two most recent.

Pagan Clergy at Detroit Rally

As most readers know, Alton Sterling was killed in an altercation with police on July 7, and before the next morning’s news even hit, Philando Castile also was killed during a traffic stop for a broken tail light on his car.

On Friday, July 8th, PBN News Network’s own Kenya Coviak put out a call to southeast Michigan Pagan clergy to attend the protest/demonstration in Detroit as Pagan clergy specifically – both to protest, and to offer magical means to help keep the attendees safe.

When asked why she called on Pagan clergy to participate, Coviak explained that there was a word-of-mouth call for clergy throughout the community, and she was shocked that there wasn’t any other Pagan clergy planning to represent our community. Given the amount of online activism in the Pagan blogosphere, she expected a large contingent of organized Pagan groups, but that was not to be.

 

Coviak noted, “many moments were turned into Abrahamic focused prayer moments which at times plead for deliverance from the forces against Jesus and nonbelievers. The turn to deity reflected the overall spiritual current.”

Detroit has a long history of racial tensions – between the deep segregation of 8 Mile, and the waves of immigrants that have taken over various suburbs over the years, distrust runs deep. Detroit also has a history of distrust of the police. And yet, it would seem that a wide range of people turned out for this protest.

Unexpectedly, Coviak did meet a surprising number of Pagans in the crowd.  “I had the honor to speak to many who were Pagan and felt they were the only ones in Detroit to be there who were not Christian or Jewish. Actually, there were Pagan Queer Jews in attendance as well. Along with almost every nationality you can name. It was a true rainbow tribe.”

 

Photo taken by Kenya Coviak showing some of the attendees at the protest at Campus Martius Park in Detroit – white, black, and others, including a woman in a hijab.

 

The protest in Detroit was peaceful, and Coviak said when she returned home that she had used sage to cleanse numerous people, including  Detroit police officers, and although her fingers were burnt, her heart was at peace.

Ms. Coviak will be publishing more on her experiences in the near future.

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